WELCOME TO NANOBIOTECH+ART

This course studies how bioart blurs distinctions between science and art through the combination of artistic and scientific processes, creating wide public debate. It explores the history of biotechnology as well as social implications of this science.
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Please contact Prof. Victoria Vesna if you are interested in joining this class.


BLOGS

Horse Zodiac - Event #3

For my last event blog, I attended a Hox Zodiac Event about the Horse Zodiac.  Growing up, I have been surrounded by Zodiac Culture; I am half Japanese and half Thai.  In this webinar, I watched hosts carefully deconstruct the connection they found with their zodiac, the horse.  One webinar guest, Aleksandra Mara, reflected on her immediate recognition of a My Human Design Chart.  The Chart carefully laid out different facets of Horse persona

Aquarium of the Pacific - Event #2

Last weekend, I spent hours floating between different exhibits at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific.  The last time I had attended an aquarium was as a child, transfixed by the cute penguins and darting schools of colorful fish. Now, years later, I watch the jellyfish and penguins with an increased understanding of habitat loss and ocean pollution.  

Jessica Irish Webinar - Event #1

One of my favorite parts about this course are all of the different speakers and artists that Professor Vesna introduces us to.  As a Human Biology and Society major, I have little experience with the majority of our speakers.  For this week, we were treated to a webinar featuring Jess Irish.  Not only is she an accomplished professor, but she also directed the short film “This Mortal Plastik”, about the realities of plastic pollution

Event #3: Fowler Museum - Aboriginal Screen-Printed Textiles

I was able to visit the Fowler Museum once more, however, this time I explored the Aboriginal Screen-Printed Textiles from Australia’s Top-End exhibit! I found the exhibit to be incredibly beautiful and interesting - I could’ve walked around for hours looking at the various textiles and reading the corresponding information! 

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